ALMA Discovers Earliest Gigantic Black Hole Storm - School of Science, the University of Tokyo
Jun 11, 2021

ALMA Discovers Earliest Gigantic Black Hole Storm

 

Overview of the press release

Researchers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) discovered a titanic galactic wind driven by a supermassive black hole 13.1 billion years ago. This is the earliest-yet-observed example of such a wind to date and is a telltale sign that huge black holes have a profound effect on the growth of galaxies from the very early history of the Universe.
 

Figure: 

ALMA image of the distant galaxy J1243+0100 hosting a supermassive black hole in its center. The distribution of the quiet gas in the galaxy is shown in yellow and the distribution of high-speed galactic wind is shown in blue. The wind is located in the center of the galaxy, which indicates the wind is driven by the supermassive black hole. Credit: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO), Izumi et al.

 

The paper describing these observation results, Takuma Izumi et al. “Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs). XIII. Large-scale Feedback and Star Formation in a Low-Luminosity Quasar at z = 7.07,” has been accepted by the Astrophysical Journal.

 

Professor Kotaro Kohno (Institute of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo) , Professor Nobunari Kashikawa (Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science) and  Associate Professor John Silverman (Kavli IPMU / Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science)  also contributed to this research.

 

To read the full press release, please visit the website of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

 

Publication details


Journal

The Astrophysical Journal

Title
Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs). XIII. Large-scale Feedback and Star Formation in a Low-Luminosity Quasar at z = 7.07
Authors
Takuma Izumi et al.
DOI

https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-4357/abf6dc

 

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