【EVENT】The 2nd School of Science Café 2021 ~Online~ - School of Science, the University of Tokyo
Aug 4, 2021

【EVENT】The 2nd School of Science Café 2021 ~Online~

 

Are you a high school or undergraduate student who has a passion for science? Then join us for the second School of Science Café and learn about exciting and topical research being conducted at the School of Science. At this event, you will also get the rare opportunity to interact with UTokyo professors and ask them your questions about research and student life at the School of Science, all from the comfort of your own home.

This online event will be held entirely in English and is open to students worldwide. We hope to see you there!
 

Date and Time

    Saturday, September 11, 2021
    8:00 PM – 10:00 PM JST

Venue

    Online (Zoom)
Program
8:00-8:05 PM Message from the Dean
8:05-8:10 PM Introduction
8:10-8:40 PM

Lecture 1:

Unveiling "Hidden" Activity in the Universe through Submillimeter Observations
(Bunyo Hatsukade)

8:40-8:50 PM Q&A
8:50-9:20 PM

Lecture 2:

Development of a novel iron oxide nanomagnet for magnetic recording and electromagnetic wave absorption
(Marie Yoshikiyo)

9:20-9:30 PM Q&A
9:30-10:00 PM Discussion

 

Speakers

 

Unveiling "Hidden" Activity in the Universe through Submillimeter Observations
Dr. Hatsukade


Bunyo Hatsukade, Assistant Professor,
Institute of Astronomy

— About the Speaker —
Bunyo Hatsukade is an Assistant Professor at the Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, the University of Tokyo. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, in 2010. His research field is galaxy formation and evolution through radio observations.

You can see the light from stars in the night sky, but that is only a fraction of their total light, because visible light is subject to be absorbed by dust floating in space. Dust absorbs visible and ultraviolet light and re-emits the energy at far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Therefore, by using these wavelengths, we can probe "hidden" activity in the universe, which cannot be traced by visible light. It is known that star-forming activity was more active, and at the same time, the fraction of dust-obscured activity was higher, in the early universe than at present. In this lecture, I will show you how we explore "true" activities of star formation and galaxy evolution through submillimeter observations.

Development of a novel iron oxide nanomagnet for magnetic recording and electromagnetic wave absorption

Dr. Yoshikiyo

Marie Yoshikiyo, Project Assistant Professor,
Department of Chemistry

— About the Speaker —

Marie Yoshikiyo is a Project Assistant Professor at the Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo. She received her Ph.D in 2021 from the Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo. Her research interest focuses on the development of functional materials based on metal oxides and metal complexes.

Iron oxides are found as many different phases. Representative phases are hematite (α-Fe2O3), also known as red rust, and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3). In our laboratory, we developed a rare phase of Fe2O3, epsilon iron oxide (ε-Fe2O3), which exhibits a strong magnetic anisotropy. Due to its unique magnetic property, this material could be downsized to nanometer-size particles, which is important for magnetic recording. Furthermore, ε-Fe2O3 shows high-frequency electromagnetic absorption in the millimeter wave region. This simple iron oxide could contribute to future technologies for big data and the internet of things (IoT). In this lecture, I will introduce the development of functional nanomagnets from basic science to industrial applications.

Capacity

    50
Pre-registration is required.

Fee

Free

Intended Audience

○ High school students

○ Undergraduate students

Registration

Registration Form

Registration period: July 19, 2021 to August 27, 2021 

We have reached capacity for this event. Thank you! 

Our Gift to You

Students living in Japan who register for the event will receive a small gift in the mail. Unfortunately, we are unable to offer this gift to participants living outside of Japan due to the pandemic. We sincerely apologize for the inconvenience.

Contact Information

The Office of Communication, School of Science, The University of Tokyo

TEL 070-3139-3345
E-mail kouhou.s@gs.mail.u-tokyo.ac.jp

― Office of Communication ―

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