Six GSS researchers awarded the Commendation for Science and Technology Prizes 2014 by MEXT - School of Science, the University of Tokyo
May 20, 2014

Six GSS researchers awarded the Commendation for Science and Technology Prizes 2014 by MEXT

The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) announced the recipients of the Commendation for Science and Technology Prizes 2014. From the Graduate School of Science, three researchers received the Prizes for Science and Technology and three received the Young Scientists' Prize for their outstanding achievements in research and development and the promotion of science and technology.

Professor Kaoru Sato (Department of Earth and Planetary Science) was a co-winner of the Prize for Science and Technology (Development Category) for "The development of the Antarctic Syowa MST/IS radar". The research group constructed the Antarctic Syowa MST/IS radar (PANSY) to observe various atmospheric phenomena in the Antarctic area for scientific clarification of geoenvironmental changes such as global warming and ozone holes.

Professor Hiroshi Nishihara (Department of Chemistry) was awarded the Prize for Science and Technology (Research Category) for "Research on coordination synthesis of extended molecular systems with photoelectronic functions and chemical devices". He developed novel functional materials suitable for molecular devices, such as optical switching molecules, luminescent molecules, and conductive metal complex nanosheets with synthesis of coordination bond networks, on the basis of "coordination programming", a new concept for creating materials.

Professor Yoshitaka Fukada (Department of Biological Sciences) was awarded the Prize for Science and Technology (Research Category) for "Research on control of clock proteins for circadian rhythm systems". He uncovered that the clock mechanism through transcription and translation of a group of clock(-related) genes is precisely regulated by various combinations of post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination of clock proteins.

Associate Professor Kyoko Ito (Ohashi) (Department of Biological Sciences) received the Young Scientists' Prize forF "Research on molecular mechanism regulating plant cell differentiation". She analyzed the control mechanism for development and differentiation of plant cells using two experiments, stoma cell differentiation and vascular differentiation, to clarify an important regulatory gene expression network.

Professor Keisuke Goda (Department of Chemistry) was awarded the Young Scientists' Prize for "Research on ultrafast camera and industrial and medical application". He invented high-speed imaging, which is the world's fastest method, based on a novel imaging principle, and is a basic technology used in a wide variety of research areas. With the new technology, he developed an ultrafast camera for continuously imaging 10 million images a second at about 100 ps shutter speed.

Assistant Professor Hiroshi Nishimasu (Department of Biological Sciences) was awarded the Young Scientists' Prize for "Research on the molecular basis for the diversification of enzymes". He elucidated a novel function of enzymes by X-ray crystallography and function analysis based on the tertiary structure. He found that a shape-shifting FBPA/P protein in hyperthermophilic archaeon catalyzes two different chemical reactions. The discovery is highly valuable because it demolishes a conventional biochemical theory that "one enzyme catalyzes one reaction".

Professor Kaoru Sato

Professor Kaoru Sato

02 (1)

Professor Hiroshi Nishihara

03

Professor Yoshitaka Fukada

04

Associate Professor Kyoko Ito (Ohashi)

05

Professor Keisuke Goda

06

Assistant Professor Hiroshi Nishimasu

 

 

 

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